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The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, like all states in the USA, has a child endangerment statute.  Currently, that statute is being invoked in a legal rehash of the Jerry Sandusky ‘pedophile’ allegations for several Penn State University higher-ups.

Allegedly, one of the current defendants saw Mr. Sandusky with a minor boy in a shower and did not report that to authorities.  Now, for that omission, he faces up to five years imprisonment under “child endangerment” charges.

What’s child endangerment per the statue?

Pennsylvania child abuse laws, like the abuse laws found in other states, fall under the criminal or penal code. The crime is broadly defined to include any type of cruelty inflicted on a child, such as mental abuse, physical abuse, sexual assault or exploitation, and neglect.  Charges for physical child abuse often include assault and battery. Additionally, child abuse laws include provisions requiring certain adults with access to children (such as teachers and doctors) to report signs of abuse.  [1]

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A comprehensive article that explains why many are unhappy with questionable aspects of current vaccination programs, in particular, mandatory enforcement.All very sensible and rational, like any discussion should be about any issue that is of such importance to our health, especially that of our children.Any issue with a large amount of contradictory evidence, information and opinion, that involves a dominant agenda factor, should not be permitted to become an across-the-board mandate.

Source: Why Don’t You Vaccinate?

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It must have been shame that drove doctors at a California hospital to hide the body of an infant who had suddenly died after receiving eight simultaneous vaccinations. The parents were never allowed to see the body of their son before he was cremated.

Even after a year and four months had gone by, the official autopsy had not been revealed. Their son, Matthew, had been given DTaP, IPV, Hib, PCV, Hep B and Hep A in three shots, one in the right arm and two in the left leg, just a day before his sudden death.

According to mother Crystal Downing, Mathew became grumpy and cried a lot the day after receiving the eight inoculations. She thought this was normal behavior following vaccination.

She wrote, “I thought I would give it another day to see if he was still grumpy but we didn’t get to the next day. Matthew was gone by then. He was found lifeless. He went to bed that Tuesday night and my husband found him Wednesday morning.”

The parents then tried to revive Mathew. They called 9-1-1 and rushed him to Colorado River Medical Center in Needles, CA, where he was swiftly pronounced dead. As most cases of vaccine-associated infant death go, the cause of death was ruled sudden infant death syndrome. No investigations were conducted on the cause of death. Parents are often told to just accept a baby’s death as a random even, even after their infant was injected with multiple toxic substances.

When the parents returned home, they waited for updates on the autopsy. For days, they waited with no reply. They made numerous phone calls. After weeks went by, they finally received word that their son was going to be cremated. They were told that they could not see Mathew because of the condition his body was in. They were not allowed to say their goodbyes.

All they ever got was their son’s ashes.

Now, after a year and four months of waiting, the family still awaits their son’s autopsy. They now know that their son had been given a vaccine not approved for his age and an extra dose of a hepatitis B vaccine.

Mother of deceased infant now urges parents to do their own research on vaccines
Now the mother, Crystal Downing, urges parents to research vaccines before offering their children up to whatever a doctor says. Vaccine violence and abuse such as this continues to show the importance of a parent’s right to choose what’s best for their child. Doctors who are hell-bent on the philosophy of vaccination should be questioned. The use of multiple vaccines at once should be questioned, especially since there are no clinical trials showing the safety of multiple injections. Stimulating an adaptive immune response for multiple viruses with aluminum adjuvants should be questioned. Doctors should be teachers first and allow patients to give informed consent of the dangers of vaccines. Sadly, many doctors fail to give informed consent, because they believe in vaccine science as if it’s a religion. It’s rare to find an MD who has investigated how the ingredients in vaccines cause negative reactions that result in brain damage or death.

Medical professionals continuously just write off infant death after vaccination as “sudden infant death syndrome.”

About her family’s horrible tragedy, Crystal Downing wrote, “I want to tell other parents, they say vaccinations are safe, but in reality, they aren’t.

“Ask questions and know which vaccines they plan to give to your baby. Know the risks associated with all of the vaccines they plan to give during the checkup. And remember, it’s your choice. It’s your child. And whatever you do, don’t let them mix the vaccines into one needle or give them so many at once because if you don’t think this won’t harm your child, then look at the child I lost. It is possible.”

“My son was injected with 8 vaccines, if you don’t know what is in them, learn! When I did, I was shocked and mad at myself for not questioning this before. Matthew is the reason I opened my eyes, to see what vaccines can really do to a baby, let alone anyone. I’m not the only one who believes vaccines are not what they claim they are. I really hope this opens parent’s eyes who do vaccinate their children.”

 

Permalink to this article:
http://www.naturalnews.com/049668_vaccine_damage_SIDS_medical_abuse.html

 

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— Colorado parents seeking to exempt their children from vaccinations for personal reasons would face required education under a proposal that advanced in the state House Friday.

The proposal has sparked strong feelings among lawmakers about parental control.

Republican House Leader Brian DelGrosso told lawmakers that while he immunized his children, his younger brother doesn’t believe in vaccinations.

“And basically what this bill does is, the sponsor is basically saying that my brother is an idiot, my brother is a moron,” he said, adding that the message lawmakers are sending is that they know better than parents.

“That’s exactly what this bill does,” said DelGrosso, who represents Loveland. “You can spin it any other way you like, but this basically says, ‘Parents of Colorado that choose not to get immunization for their kids, you’re too stupid to make this decision on your own.’”

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Out of 30,000 Children, Zero are Autistic who have not been Vaccinated

By DAN OLMSTED, UPI Senior Editor
Published: Dec. 7, 2005 at 2:08 PM

CHICAGO, Dec. 7 (UPI) — It’s a far piece from the horse-and-buggies of Lancaster County, Pa., to the cars and freeways of Cook County, Ill.

But thousands of children cared for by Homefirst Health Services in metropolitan Chicago have at least two things in common with thousands of Amish children in rural Lancaster: They have never been vaccinated. And they don’t have autism.

“We have a fairly large practice. We have about 30,000 or 35,000 children that we’ve taken care of over the years, and I don’t think we have a single case of autism in children delivered by us who never received vaccines,” said Dr. Mayer Eisenstein, Homefirst’s medical director who founded the practice in 1973. Homefirst doctors have delivered more than 15,000 babies at home, and thousands of them have never been vaccinated.

The few autistic children Homefirst sees were vaccinated before their families became patients, Eisenstein said. “I can think of two or three autistic children who we’ve delivered their mother’s next baby, and we aren’t really totally taking care of that child — they have special care needs. But they bring the younger children to us. I don’t have a single case that I can think of that wasn’t vaccinated.”

The autism rate in Illinois public schools is 38 per 10,000, according to state Education Department data; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention puts the national rate of autism spectrum disorders at 1 in 166 — 60 per 10,000.

“We do have enough of a sample,” Eisenstein said. “The numbers are too large to not see it. We would absolutely know. We’re all family doctors. If I have a child with autism come in, there’s no communication. It’s frightening. You can’t touch them. It’s not something that anyone would miss.”

No one knows what causes autism, but federal health authorities say it isn’t childhood immunizations. Some parents and a small minority of doctors and scientists, however, assert vaccines are responsible.

This column has been looking for autism in never-vaccinated U.S. children in an effort to shed light on the issue. We went to Chicago to meet with Eisenstein at the suggestion of a reader, and we also visited Homefirst’s office in northwest suburban Rolling Meadows. Homefirst has four other offices in the Chicago area and a total of six doctors.

Eisenstein stresses his observations are not scientific. “The trouble is this is just anecdotal in a sense, because what if every autistic child goes somewhere else and (their family) never calls us or they moved out of state?”

In practice, that’s unlikely to account for the pronounced absence of autism, says Eisenstein, who also has a bachelor’s degree in statistics, a master’s degree in public health and a law degree.

Homefirst follows state immunization mandates, but Illinois allows religious exemptions if parents object based either on tenets of their faith or specific personal religious views. Homefirst does not exclude or discourage such families. Eisenstein, in fact, is author of the book “Don’t Vaccinate Before You Educate!” and is critical of the CDC’s vaccination policy in the 1990s, when several new immunizations were added to the schedule, including Hepatitis B as early as the day of birth. Several of the vaccines — HepB included — contained a mercury-based preservative that has since been phased out of most childhood vaccines in the United States.

Medical practices with Homefirst’s approach to immunizations are rare. “Because of that, we tend to attract families that have questions about that issue,” said Dr. Paul Schattauer, who has been with Homefirst for 20 years and treats “at least” 100 children a week.

Schattauer seconded Eisenstein’s observations. “All I know is in my practice I don’t see autism. There is no striking 1-in-166,” he said.

Earlier this year we reported the same phenomenon in the mostly unvaccinated Amish. CDC Director Dr. Julie Gerberding told us the Amish “have genetic connectivity that would make them different from populations that are in other sectors of the United States.” Gerberding said, however, studies “could and should be done” in more representative unvaccinated groups — if they could be found and their autism rate documented.

Chicago is America’s prototypical “City of Big Shoulders,” to quote Carl Sandburg, and Homefirst’s mostly middle-class families seem fairly representative. A substantial number are conservative Christians who home-school their children. They are mostly white, but the Homefirst practice also includes black and Hispanic families and non-home-schooling Jews, Catholics and Muslims.

They tend to be better educated, follow healthier diets and breast-feed their children much longer than the norm — half of Homefirst’s mothers are still breast-feeding at two years. Also, because Homefirst relies less on prescription drugs including antibiotics as a first line of treatment, these children have less exposure to other medicines, not just vaccines.

Schattauer, interviewed at the Rolling Meadows office, said his caseload is too limited to draw conclusions about a possible link between vaccines and autism. “With these numbers you’d have a hard time proving or disproving anything,” he said. “You can only get a feeling about it.

“In no way would I be an advocate to stand up and say we need to look at vaccines, because I don’t have the science to say that,” Schattauer said. “But I don’t think the science is there to say that it’s not.”

Schattauer said Homefirst’s patients also have significantly less childhood asthma and juvenile diabetes compared to national rates. An office manager who has been with Homefirst for 17 years said she is aware of only one case of severe asthma in an unvaccinated child.

“Sometimes you feel frustrated because you feel like you’ve got a pretty big secret,” Schattauer said. He argues for more research on all those disorders, independent of political or business pressures.

The asthma rate among Homefirst patients is so low it was noticed by the Blue Cross group with which Homefirst is affiliated, according to Eisenstein.

“In the alternative-medicine network which Homefirst is part of, there are virtually no cases of childhood asthma, in contrast to the overall Blue Cross rate of childhood asthma which is approximately 10 percent,” he said. “At first I thought it was because they (Homefirst’s children) were breast-fed, but even among the breast-fed we’ve had asthma. We have virtually no asthma if you’re breast-fed and not vaccinated.”

Because the diagnosis of asthma is based on emergency-room visits and hospital admissions, Eisenstein said, Homefirst’s low rate is hard to dispute. “It’s quantifiable — the definition is not reliant on the doctor’s perception of asthma.”

Several studies have found a risk of asthma from vaccination; others have not. Studies that include never-vaccinated children generally find little or no asthma in that group.

Earlier this year Florida pediatrician Dr. Jeff Bradstreet said there is virtually no autism in home-schooling families who decline to vaccinate for religious reasons — lending credence to Eisenstein’s observations.

“It’s largely non-existent,” said Bradstreet, who treats children with autism from around the country. “It’s an extremely rare event.”

Bradstreet has a son whose autism he attributes to a vaccine reaction at 15 months. His daughter has been home-schooled, he describes himself as a “Christian family physician,” and he knows many of the leaders in the home-school movement.

“There was this whole subculture of folks who went into home-schooling so they would never have to vaccinate their kids,” he said. “There’s this whole cadre who were never vaccinated for religious reasons.”

In that subset, he said, “unless they were massively exposed to mercury through lots of amalgams (mercury dental fillings in the mother) and/or big-time fish eating, I’ve not had a single case.”

Federal health authorities and mainstream medical groups emphatically dismiss any link between autism and vaccines, including the mercury-based preservative thimerosal. Last year a panel of the Institute of Medicine, part of the National Academies, said there is no evidence of such a link, and funding should henceforth go to “promising” research.

Thimerosal, which is 49.6 percent ethyl mercury by weight, was phased out of most U.S. childhood immunizations beginning in 1999, but the CDC recommends flu shots for pregnant women and last year began recommending them for children 6 to 23 months old. Most of those shots contain thimerosal.

Thimerosal-preserved vaccines are currently being injected into millions of children in developing countries around the world. “My mandate … is to make sure at the end of the day that 100,000,000 are immunized … this year, next year and for many years to come … and that will have to be with thimerosal-containing vaccines,” said John Clements of the World Health Organization at a June 2000 meeting called by the CDC.

That meeting was held to review data that thimerosal might be linked with autism and other neurological problems. But in 2004 the Institute of Medicine panel said evidence against a link is so strong that health authorities, “whether in the United States or other countries, should not include autism as a potential risk” when formulating immunization policies.

But where is the simple, straightforward study of autism in never-vaccinated U.S. children? Based on our admittedly anecdotal and limited reporting among the Amish, the home-schooled and now Chicago’s Homefirst, that may prove to be a significant omission.

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